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Thread: My Top 10 Favorite Survival Knives of All Time

  1. #71
    No, but then I don't entertain mountain man fantasies. Sorry, ya got me beat. Beat me, hawgrider, beat me.
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  2. #72
    Smooth conversationalist Gunners Mate's Avatar
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    I would want my oyster shuckin knife, a cold beer and one of these to help eat all those tasty oysters Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #73
    Just this guy Inor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoreAmmoOK View Post
    No one blade can efficiently do everything. I have a Mora in my GHB, inexpensive, holds a pretty good edge, and good for doing lite work. In the bag is also an Ontario Knife SP-15, pointy, sharp, serrated back side, it'll do a lot of damage. Attached to the bag is a machete, not a great one but it'll get me home. In my pocket there is always the Buck. I don't pack a saw, just what I need to get me n wife the 40 miles from work to home.
    So you like a serrated blade? I am curious to know why.

    I HATE serrated blades! I am not trying to start a religious war here. (On second thought, actually I am trying to start a religious war because an argument over knife blade styles would be far more interesting than the rest of the bullshit arguments on this thread.)

    So why a serrated blade? I use my pocket knife probably 20 times per day for everyday tasks. I use it for everything from opening packaging to cutting drywall. But every time I try to use a serrated blade, it causes me more work than it saves. So, just a question on your opinion.
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  6. #74
    VIP Member! Sasquatch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inor View Post
    So you like a serrated blade? I am curious to know why.

    I HATE serrated blades! I am not trying to start a religious war here. (On second thought, actually I am trying to start a religious war because an argument over knife blade styles would be far more interesting than the rest of the bullshit arguments on this thread.)

    So why a serrated blade? I use my pocket knife probably 20 times per day for everyday tasks. I use it for everything from opening packaging to cutting drywall. But every time I try to use a serrated blade, it causes me more work than it saves. So, just a question on your opinion.
    You didn't ask me but I'll throw in my .02 anyway. My EDC has a serrated edge and I've found it useful many times. I've cut small branches off of trees for kindling. I've used it to cut cardboard for targets and I find it cuts twine or paracord easier than the straight part of the blade.
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  8. #75
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    Most the time I don't care for a serrated blade either. I have this one because it was on sale for about half price, seems like it was less than $25. More than substantial enough enough for a GHB. I don't think I could to let a $100+ knife spend it's life just sittin in a bag. Useful, durable, and inexpensive are the properties of things in the bag.
    As mentioned, the serrations are useful for cutting rope and cord, would be a bitch to sharpen though.

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  10. #76
    ədˈminəˌstrātər hawgrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoreAmmoOK View Post
    No one blade can efficiently do everything. I have a Mora in my GHB, inexpensive, holds a pretty good edge, and good for doing lite work. In the bag is also an Ontario Knife SP-15, pointy, sharp, serrated back side, it'll do a lot of damage. Attached to the bag is a machete, not a great one but it'll get me home. In my pocket there is always the Buck. I don't pack a saw, just what I need to get me n wife the 40 miles from work to home.
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  11. #77
    I use the serrated blade on my Leatherman occasionally, but most of the time my straight blade is sharp enough to cut anything I need.

    For my usage, which may or may not be considered valid by certain forum members who can't seem to back off, (so I won't either) a serrated blade is actually detrimental.

    I do, however, see their uses, particularly when dealing with lines on a boat. As an example, we used to fish below Keystone Dam in Oklahoma when they were running the gates open. You anchored, bow toward the dam, and let the boat drift backwards until the line was tight. Sometimes they would increase the flow, and you had to weigh anchor quickly to avoid your bow being pulled under. If the anchor was hung in the brush and debris, a serrated knife saved many boats by making a quick cut.
    I fear the nation I loved may be gone. The best I hope for now is to die with honor in the coming civil war, and that my grandchildren be spared the pain of a tyrannical government.

    Visit my website:
    coastiedadforpresident@bitemeyouleftistbastards.co m

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